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 Mental Health and your Fear Blog, or shit you need to watch out for
DJay32
 Posted: Feb 12 2013, 11:50 PM
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Sally Death
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For the record, I'm still adding all this to the article on the website. And Squeek, I'm filling in the appropriate numbers for when you forget which number you're on. :D I feel useful, somewhat!


EXHIBITS:
Viceking's Graab (Step inside the maze. You could spend an eternity here.)
The Mythology of Empathy (Eight songs, nine tracks. Welcome death.)
Ancestor (Five tracks. Death of the Artist and Chinese mythology.)
Fear (A visual art exhibit in blog format.)
Nobody anymore, never again (Another visual art exhibit in blog format.)
The Everyblogger Triad: 1, 2, 3 (Embrace the bad writing, give into your psyche.)
PLAN 31 (Frank Slenderman: Ace Attorney)
OH GOD THE RAPTURE IS BURNING (400,000 words. Five months. All Fears. Excess. On fifth draft, not final.)
Topography Genera (15 blogs. Conventional horror. See seas rise.)
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alliterator
 Posted: Feb 13 2013, 07:51 PM
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The Jerkface Man
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This is a really good article about schizophrenia. From a person who actually has schizophrenia, Elyn Saks.


Faces, Strange and Secret: An Anthology of Stories from da Fears Mythos: on sale from Amazon, Kindle, and Smashwords

My Finished Stories.

My Ongoing Stories:
Channel Fear (informational, educational, cynical)
The Supernatural Anaesthetist (seeing where science takes us)
Once There Was (the king is the kingdom)
An Old Man's Winter Night (at the winter of the world)
Unwashed and Somewhat Slightly Dazed (working for the man)
The Secret History of the World (unstuck in time)
Notes from the Underground (a place to stay)
Phantasmagorical (a bedtime story)
Paranoia: A Manifesto (wrecking the wall)
The Day The Music Died (running from sound and sorrow)
Abraham's Men (knights, ghosts, and shadows)
Pest Control (pulling the wings off of flies)
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pullingoffmasks
 Posted: Feb 14 2013, 05:36 PM
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QUOTE (alliterator @ Feb 13 2013, 08:51 PM)
This is a really good article about schizophrenia. From a person who actually has schizophrenia, Elyn Saks.

SHE'S THE ONE WHO WROTE "THE CENTRE WILL NOT HOLD"!

THANK you Alli for reminding me.

And yes, definitely recommend you read anything by her.


Tea Time with the Traitor Masks and sewers and trains, OH MY!
525,600 minutes of absolute bullshit and bastardry James appears to be a bit busy with life, blogging shall resume shortly
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Mental Health and Your Fear Blog A very brief primer to things to consider when writing a character that is 'going crazy'
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Want to find out why my blogs are so slow to update, or real life the blog?
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Finished blogs
Pulling off Masks ...but with a whimper...
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erratic
 Posted: Feb 14 2013, 09:22 PM
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I personally recommend 'The Center Will Not Hold' by Elyn Saks. Back before I got diagnosed, it really helped give me hope that just because I was experiencing possible schizoaffective or schizophrenia (as it stands, the only reason I'm diagnosed with 'psychotic depression' is because by the book, I haven't NOT been depressed long enough to tell if it's schizoaffective or not, or something like that).

I also recommend 'The Quiet Room' by Lori Schiller. It offered similar hope, and showed quite well how someone with psychosis can hide it at times. It's told from the perspective of Lori, as well as her friends and family in certain chapters, if I remember correctly.

Let me look at my bookcase real quick...

"Surviving Schizophrenia" by Fuller Torrey get's mixed reviews from me. It seems to be pro forced medication and stuff like that (which I....don't know where I stand on that, but the entire concept makes me feel uncomfortable), but the first few chapters are quite good, since they mostly aren't Torrey's writing, but a collection of quotes and some studies that show examples of how it is to live with psychosis and schizophrenia. Then again, he also showcases his theory bacteria from cats cause schizophrenia, so...yeah. The first chapter or two was worth the cost of the book just because I related SO much, but most stuff beyond that is....eh.

"I Am Not Sick, I Don't Need Help!" by Xavier Amador gets mixed reviews from me as well. It has good info on how to work with someone who is experiencing psychosis (don't directly confront their delusions, make sure the person who is experiencing psychosis feels as if they're being heard, ect), but it's also pro forced medication and such. It's aimed at families of people who don't know they are experiencing psychosis. I gave it to my mom just so she'd know how to work with me if I ever had another really bad break and lost my insight, and so she'd have a list of resources of how to get help for me, since I AM okay with forced medication for myself, in the event that I lose insight and get worse.

'Diagnoses: Schizophrenia' by Rachel Miller and Susan E. Mason is shortish, but aimed at someone (usually someone in their late teens or early twenties) who's been diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective. It contains many first person accounts of how schizophrenia feels, how treatment can feel, and how they feel after treatment. It's fairly pro medication, but I still like it (but then again, I'm fairly pro medication myself), though I sadly can't completely remember -why- I liked it. I remember it being fairly hopeful, and not full of 'omg your life is going to be horrible from now on', which I really appreciated.

I have a ton more books about adult ADHD that I can share/review, and if people are interested, I can also share my experience of living with ADHD, and how it's not just being 'distracted and hyper'.
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TeaTimeTraitor
 Posted: Aug 17 2015, 01:57 PM
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At the risk of being yelled at for resurrecting a reasonably dead/out of date post, I arrive back here to talk about medication options.

General trigger warnings for discussion of suicide. ...probably in a much more cheery/less than respectful tone than I should have about it as a topic.

Part whatever the fuck this is: Crazy Meds, What They Do, and What Happens When Drugs Don't Work

I am going to prefix this with: I am not a psychiatrist. Like with a lot of these posts it is coloured by my own personal experiences and what research I can do.

That aside.

Most drugs used for mental health conditions fall into one of four broad categories:
QUOTE
~ Anti-psychotics
~ Anti-depressants
~ Anxiolytic (anti-anxiety)
~ Stimulants/AD(H)D meds


Within those four groups, three will break down into further categories as follows
QUOTE
~ Anti-psychotics- Novel or 'old'
~ Anti-depressants- selective seretonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs)...also referred to as 'typical' or 'atypical' anti-depressants
~ Anxiolytic- Benzodiazepines and Barbiturates*


*- This class of drugs is no longer considered 'useful' for managing anxiety due to it's incredible soporific effects, highly addictive nature, and high risk of fatal overdose. However, it is used quite frequently (in combination with other compounds) to manage seizure disorders.

All drugs used to 'treat' mental health conditions are not always going to work....or if they do work, they've got some fun side effects that may/may not be as bad as the signs of the disorder that they were supposed to be 'treating' in the first place. (More on this second portion in a bit)

In fact most 'treatment' for most conditions are more akin to management options, as some (such as anti-psychotics and anti-depressants) can only help with positive signs, not negative ones.

In addition to this, with the exception of a few anxiolytic drugs, most psych meds take quite some time to cross over the blood-brain barrier and build up enough concentration to actually do anything.

So, as the example that I'll use though out the remainder of this post: Sertraline (also known as Zoloft).

Sertraline is an anti-depressant of the SSRI classification.

Initial uptake (ie, the point where you'll first feeling an increase in energy/mood) takes 3-7 days, with functional uptake (ie, the point where your body actually starts using it and it's crossed the blood- brain barrier) taking around 24-28 days.

This, practically, translates into about a month where your body will cycle through a range of side effects and functional quirks until it settles on something and actually is 'useful.'

(And sertraline is a 'fast' uptake drug. Some others (mostly MAOI class) actually take much longer, but have much stronger effects)

So, what are common side effects for most crazy meds?

Most come with the joyous side effects of weight gain, vivid dreams, issues sleeping, general feeling of 'blech,' drowsiness, nausea, and screwball stuff with appetite and food habits.

Some (a few SSRIs, most MAOIs, lithium, and a few typical and atypical anti-psychotics) also come with black box warnings.

Black box warnings being 'this drug may actually fuck you over worse than what it should be managing'...which, for quite a few, boils down to "you know this drug which you've been put on to prevent you offing yourself? Yeah, you might actually have a higher chance of offing yourself after you've been put on it*"

(*- Sertraline is a black box warning anti-depressant.
The theory as to why this happens is that all anti-depressants do- especially SSRIs- is increase energy. Thus, if the reason you've not killed yourself is because you've not got the energy to, sertraline will give you the energy in spades.)

In addition to this, a lot of psych meds also place limits on what you can eat, either due to the food fucking with the metabolism of the drug or creating compounds which can kill you.

For most, grapefruit (juice, fruit, extract) will render the drug incapable of functioning* in the body.

For MAOIs, you are supposed to avoid aged and/or fermented products, as the interaction between the drug and the food can/will kill you. Granted this issue is a lot bigger in older MAOIs, but it's still enough of an issue that most doctors will advise you to avoid aged cheeses, alcohol, etc whilst on MAOIs.

(*- As a side note, crazy meds are not the only drug which grapefruit fucks with. Birth control, thyroxine, most drugs used to manage osteoporosis and arthritis, statins, and a few cancer treatment meds all have the same issue.)

Going back to the example of sertraline, it does have a unique pair of side effects which (most) other SSRIs don't have (as far as I am aware).

And those are:
~ During the first two months of use it can actually increase anxiety. (and not a little...it will do it to the point of harmful malfunction, which is why some psych folks actually recommend providing a two month script for a low dose anixolytic in conjunction with sertraline)
~ If you have a predisposition to bipolar depression and/or manic episodes, it can actually trip them into full 'function' and in such a manner that the mania seen is disphoric (angry) mania as opposed to euphoric (happy) mania.

As such, sertraline is not supposed to be given to individuals with history of anxiety or bipolar disorder in their family background.
...theoretically...

Which brings me to the most important points about ANY psych med:

Responses to the drugs are very personal. What one person gets side effect/positive effect wise, may not be what another gets.

(Example: Sertraline caused me hellish issues with anxiety and dissociative episodes (which is why I requested to be taken off of it...not that the person listened /I digress)
However, a friend who was also on the same drug, had no issue with anxiety and sleep, but had issues with dreams and appetite screwballing...which I didn't have)

They are essentially giant fucking hammers for things that need teeny tiny screwdrivers to adjust

We know little to nothing about the brain on a detailed level for all the money sunk into researching it.

We know little to nothing about the actual hows and whys of most mental disorders. Yes, we have ideas as to what maybe wrong- like the current theories that depressive disorders are because of screwball stuff with seretonin uptake- but we really are just making educated guesses.

We know little about the exact function of neurotransmitters and what role their levels play in brain function.

Because of this, a lot of psych meds are 'does this work?' 'oh, good it does, doesn't matter that it screws over other systems, because it prevents certain aspects of the crazy'....'oh wait, it doesn't do what we think it does and...oooo, that works well for anxiety, but not for depression, like we thought it would'

So, yeah. Very basic primer on psych meds.

I recommend, if you want more/need to use them as part of your plots, to take a gander at Crazy Meds. It's kept very much up to date and provides you with personal testimony as to how the drugs work.

...It's also where I found out that sertraline actually increases issues with generalized anxiety, which my doctor neglected inform me of despite me informing him that I have had /issues/ with nasty icky anxiety (not linked to social situations) in the past.


~ Pulling off Masks (complete) ~ Tea Time with the Traitor (on hiatus) ~ Mine Eyes Have Seen (active)

One day I'll actually finish up everything else, as well
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Hexillith
 Posted: Aug 17 2015, 05:50 PM
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Bat One
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WHY WOULD ANYONE YELL AT YOU THIS THREAD IS AMAZING

Anyway, I see that this thread doesn't have any information about OCD yet! I can fix that. Of course, I am not a doctor, just a person with severe OCD who's studied psych and done a lot of independent reading. Also note: I have primarily-obsessional OCD with very few overt compulsions, so that is the sort I know the most about.

CW: Suicide

OCD: What It Is and What It Is Not

Sooo representation of OCD in the media is completely fucked up and inaccurate. Seriously. Don't trust anything you see on TV regarding OCD, or regarding mental health issues in general, for that matter.

The primary "feature" of OCD is not the compulsions like most people think, but the obsessions, also known as intrusive thoughts. These usually start with a single "spike," or thought that makes the person anxious. Things like "did I remember to turn off the stove?" or "did she seem mad at me?" or "what if I get sick from this" or "maybe my partner doesn't really love me."

This next part is a pretty graphic depiction of a severe obsessive-compulsive episode. Writing it, uh, triggered me, so I spoilered it.

Spoiler (Show/Hide)
Most everybody has thoughts like these, right? The difference is that obsessive-compulsive brains grab onto them and just won't let go. Because what if you did forget to turn off the stove? You remember doing it, but... it's a little fuzzy, can you really be certain? You have to be certain, because if you're not, the house'll burn down, fuck, your little sister's sleeping in there and she's too young to know what to do, she's going to die and it is all your fault and you will never be able to forgive yourself and you should just kill yourself now because you deserve it.

And this goes on and on and on. Every time you leave the house. Even when you're at home, you have to check the stove every hour or so because you can't really be certain that it's not going to erupt into flames. You feel a little better right after you do this, but soon enough you start to doubt your own memory and and you have to go check again. It's all you can think about, your brain doesn't allow anything else, you can't sleep, you can't go to work, you can't spend time with friends or your sister or your parents. By this point you probably experience panic/anxiety symptoms almost all the time. Racing thoughts, heart palpitations, numbing/tingling in the extremities, stomach pain and vomiting, tremors. Your mind is so flooded with intrusive thoughts that you can't imagine a world in which those thoughts aren't true. You know your sister's going to die, and soon, and you will not be able to survive after. It's the end of the world. Literally. As far as you're concerned, there is no more world. Not for you.


So there's a severe, worst-case OCD episode (do note that it can be much, much milder in some people or with treatment). These can last days, weeks, months, or years if untreated. The longest one I can remember having lasted about two weeks, then faded a bit and lasted maybe a month more. I was twelve at the time, but I'd had these episodes pretty much since I was born, according to my mom. That's uncommon. Usually OCD symptoms become apparent in one's teens or twenties. Sometimes it can fade with age - some people get to the point where they have no symptoms whatsoever in their later years (my dad's like this) - and sometimes it doesn't.

I don't know if this is the case for everyone, but after one of my episodes finally ends, I am extremely fragile and emotionally exhausted, sometimes for longer than than the episode lasted. I sort of feel like all my insides got burned out and now there's just a big hollow filled with ash and scorched ribs. Also normally feel depressed and suicidal (sometimes the depression lasts, sometimes it doesn't). I usually still shake at least a little, don't talk very much, and do no work if I can help it, just sleep and play video games. Thanks to therapy and medication, nowadays my episodes usually only last about 3 days max, and the burnout lasts under a week. That long episode I mentioned earlier had at least two months of burnout, probably more, I can't remember because it was a long time ago.

The first line of treatment is generally cognitive-behavioral therapy to challenge the irrational thinking at OCD's core, along with an SSRI if the person wants to try medication. Usually, a very high dose is necessary, though they won't start you out at one. Basic CBT can certainly help, but in most cases it's more of a foundation for a more difficult but much more effective form of CBT called ERP. If SSRIs aren't effective enough on their own, psychiatrists will also often prescribe a very low dose of an atypical antipsychotic such as Risperidol. These supposedly work very well for OCD but have pretty intense side effects. If racing thoughts and obsessions prevent the person from sleeping, they'll often take an antidepressant (such as Trazodone) or an atypical antipsychotic (such as Seroquel) which has sedating effects in addition to their other medication. In the very worst cases which don't respond to treatment, a last-ditch effort is to sever the malfunctioning circuit in the brain.

Now, serious OCD episodes will usually be pretty apparent from the outside, unless the person is expending a ton of effort on keeping it hidden (and is very practiced at doing so). Signs may include, but are not limited to:
- Constantly seeming distracted, staring off into space, quietness, difficulty responding when spoken to
- Visible panic symptoms, such as trembling or vomiting, for long periods of time
- Secluding themself and showing little interest in most activites (can look like depression)
- Performing overt compulsions such as asking or fishing for reassurance, hand-washing, checking, performing the same action repeatedly and often a set number of times, etc.
- Avoidance compulsions such as refusing to be around children for fear they might hurt them

Later I'll write something about specific types of OCD (overt vs. covert compulsions, subcategories such as contamination and orientation OCD, and other OC-spectrum disorders), and some stuff about supporting/helping someone with OCD.


Unseelie - The place where giants rule

Journal of the days after - Torn from xer awful embrace

Mene, Mene, Tekel, Upharsin - Read it and weep

Our Cyclical Dance - Endlessly in on itself

I'm on Tumblr and DeviantArt.

So look at the fleeting stars with fleeting eyes, and feel how the earth beneath you gives. It is all a temporary manifestation of particles, and it is all unraveling back to particulate silence. The bustle of the human day will come and will go. And then there will be night. -WtNV
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TeaTimeTraitor
 Posted: Aug 17 2015, 06:03 PM
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'cause I necro-ed summat.

And thank you.


Also, thank you for reminding me. I really should do a post on talk-type therapies in the near future.

(Except the fact I really shouldn't as there's evidence suggesting that the more you know about behavioural type therapies, the less likely they are to work. And I'm not in the mood to (further) fuck over any chance that I have of

I say this as someone who probably knows /far/ too much about normal flavoured CBT, which is the go to for NHS linked shrinks, who are already a bitch to get access to, alongside their general inaccessibilty because of gatekeeping by NHS GPs..

...Who are more likely to offer you drugs before access to services. Because actually decent NHS shrinks are spread thin and fine on the ground...

Which is why there's probably a very large percentage of the neurodivergent UK population on completely the wrong class of drug for their variety of brainweird)

(/and I'm rambling again. Yay freakin' upswings)


~ Pulling off Masks (complete) ~ Tea Time with the Traitor (on hiatus) ~ Mine Eyes Have Seen (active)

One day I'll actually finish up everything else, as well
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TeaTimeTraitor
 Posted: Aug 17 2015, 06:58 PM
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Double posting, as I realized I've been using some terminology that's not in common parlance (outside of certain developmental disorder and late to show/atypical showing disorder communities)

Part whatever, whenever, I've stopped keeping track: Gates, Gatekeeping, and their Gatekeepers

Note, this is somewhat UK specific

The process of diagnosis of any/all mental health (and developmental disorders and learning disorders) can be made analogous to a gated community.

Inside the gate is the label that the disorder has, access to services for the disorder, and general access to the community/communities surrounding it.

Outside, however, there is a giant fuck off gate and wall, guarded by a variety of individuals- both medical/psych linked AND community linked.

To gain access to everything on the other side of the gate, you first have to pass through any of the inspection/s that the guards have to throw at you.

In the UK, the primary gatekeeper for adult/late teen service access is your general practitioner (GP).

I have lots of not so nice words to say about this, most of which boil down to:

GPs are not given enough training on mental health, nor on the drugs which they will provide you.

The training they do get is so focused on unipolar depression (and social anxiety), they will consider that (ignoring the fact that the sign set for depression also fits the early sign sets for about every other major mental health complaint...) before anything else.

Because of this focus, you practically have to be near crisis and have very stereotypical signs of the disorder in question for any other condition to be considered.

Which is not so good when you consider that crisis point for more than a few disorders (psychosis and dysphoric mania spring to mind) is actually the point where the individual can cause themselves/others serious amounts of harm.

...but I digress.

A GP in the UK has two (or three) things that they can do if they think you fit criteria for a mental health issue (this is usually done after you fill out an incredibly helpful self-assessment...and again usually focuses on unipolar depression):

QUOTE
[*]Offer you drugs (usually SSRIs, see above note about the emphasis of training being placed on unipolar depression and social anxiety)
[*]Suggest you try talk based therapy. (Which, in an area which has 'good' access to services can take you up to 6 weeks to even gain access to, and then you get 12 1 hour sessions with the shrink that the NHS has in the area)
[*]If extreme enough, they will refer you to mental health services*...or if you decide that you'd prefer to try the drug-free approach first, they can/will refer you on
[*]Mental health services provides you with further possibilities of care, ie: sectioning, complex care, therapy beyond CBT


Once these have been offered/done, you've essentially been shown through the first gate. GPs rarely have enough psych know how to pin a specific label on your disorder, but will often signpost you towards folks who can provide a specific label.

From then on, the game of gatekeeping becomes much more a social aspect.

Gatekeeping plays into ableism.

To say anything elsewise, is deluding yourself.

Psychology is an immense field and can fill an entire lifetime worth of research.

However, this doesn't stop Joe Bloggs who once saw that one documentary/film/special episode on [insert disorder here] thinking that they're an expert.

This will often lead to the /fantastic/ situation where you'll get the conversation that goes like this (autism used as an example because developmental conditions get this a lot stronger in media at times):

"Hi, I'm autistic, could you not do [sensory hell thing] because it makes me [insert response to sensory hell thing]?"
"No, you can't be autistic, [insert bullshit reason here, usually something about a family member or the fact that 'real people with autism'(tm, pending) not being able to do things]"

...which yeah...

Gatekeeping also plays a role in the stereotypical 'profile' of a disorder.

Again, I'm going to use autism as an example.

The stereotype of autism (thanks to researchers like Simon Baron-Cohen and charities like A$) is a little white male who lost verbal reciprocal communication at around age 2-3.

This usually leads to GPs pretty much only looking for the disorder in...well, little white boys.

It also means that folks outside of white or male can/will/do get labeled with other disorders.

There's documented, and very well researched, issues with the Black/African American population having a chronic underdiagnosis rates of ASD.
Instead, children will often get labeled/diagnosed with much more 'serious' disorders...if they get diagnosed at all. (The usual one is schizophrenia or oppositional defiant disorder/anti-social personality disorder).

Same with ASD and designated female at birth individuals. ...they tend to either be ignored completely, or given a label later in life of one of the numerous personality disorders. Usually borderline.

....All because the gatekeepers are really only trained to observe the most stereotypical of stereotypical signs.


~ Pulling off Masks (complete) ~ Tea Time with the Traitor (on hiatus) ~ Mine Eyes Have Seen (active)

One day I'll actually finish up everything else, as well
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Hexillith
 Posted: Aug 17 2015, 07:32 PM
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I have a little to add about psychiatric care in the U.S.

It sounds like it's much easier to get specialized care here but ONLY if you have money. My therapists have all known about lots of different things but sessions cost about $75 a pop depending on the place, and insurance doesn't always help much. I needed weekly sessions at least, but we could only afford bi/triweekly and there are lots and lots of people who can't get help at all. Also, all our health facilities are overloaded and it's really really hard to find a psychiatrist or even a GP who's accepting new patients, at least in southwest Ohio. Earlier this year I had a really bad depressive episode and was pretty much completely incapacitated. My parents were worried sick and called probably 10 different psychiatrists, all of whom rejected me. We eventually found one who let us in with a little pleading from my parents. If we didn't, we'd have probably had to go to the emergency room to get me referred possibly to inpatient care. Which was overkill, but that would have been our only option.

GPs also generally don't understand mental health stuff here. When I first tried to get help my GP told me I was just having a normal reaction to realizing that the world was a scary place, despite my somatic symptoms and suicidal thoughts. Thankfully, he did refer me to a psychiatric practice. I think as it stands it'd be better to go straight to a psychiatrist if you can find one. And it's not hard to get into therapy (if you have money).

And regarding gatekeeping within disability communities: The stigma against self-diagnosis is especially bullshit because so many people can't afford to see a doctor or get tested. I don't know what it's like in other countries, but testing for ASD in the U.S. can run upwards of $2000.


Unseelie - The place where giants rule

Journal of the days after - Torn from xer awful embrace

Mene, Mene, Tekel, Upharsin - Read it and weep

Our Cyclical Dance - Endlessly in on itself

I'm on Tumblr and DeviantArt.

So look at the fleeting stars with fleeting eyes, and feel how the earth beneath you gives. It is all a temporary manifestation of particles, and it is all unraveling back to particulate silence. The bustle of the human day will come and will go. And then there will be night. -WtNV
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TeaTimeTraitor
 Posted: Aug 17 2015, 07:43 PM
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QUOTE (Hexillith @ Aug 17 2015, 07:32 PM)
And regarding gatekeeping within disability communities: The stigma against self-diagnosis is especially bullshit because so many people can't afford to see a doctor or get tested. I don't know what it's like in other countries, but testing for ASD in the U.S. can run upwards of $2000.


In the UK, you can go forward if, and only if, your GP sorta goes 'yes? if this is causing harmful malfunction'

Even then, and adult assessment will cost £250-500 depending on your area.

(Because the NHS does regularly/reliably cover adult assessments of developmental conditions, like ADHD and ASD)

I know that the only person in the Preston area (Lancashire, UK) that specializes in adult assessments in female designated individuals costs £300 for the initial assessment, and further more if you actually get a 'yeah, that sounds about right'.

The NHS tends to be slightly better with assessments in kids because of the fact there's the emphasis on early impact/intensive abuse type therapies ABA type therapies

(Gogogo Autism Act 2009)


~ Pulling off Masks (complete) ~ Tea Time with the Traitor (on hiatus) ~ Mine Eyes Have Seen (active)

One day I'll actually finish up everything else, as well
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DJay32
 Posted: Aug 18 2015, 11:41 PM
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Talk-type therapy's six sessions of 45 minutes down here in Cornwall. Anything further requires waiting twelve weeks, and even then that's just for the chance of another six sessions. And my GP wonders why I'd rather try some medication than talk it out.

Your overview of sertraline was very informative, though it further raises the question of "Why did it only take less than an hour for side effects to manifest in me?" ..hell, I have the same question regarding mirtazapine. I've little clue as to what this stuff is supposed to do besides the fine print on the pamphlet, but even that fine print doesn't mention anything about rendering me completely unconscious for over 24 hours. I can't work if I'm konked out and completely unwakeable.

...not sure why I'm ranting about meds here. This isn't quite the thread for that. I guess my point is "mental health problems aren't as fun as they're advertised to be on TV."


EXHIBITS:
Viceking's Graab (Step inside the maze. You could spend an eternity here.)
The Mythology of Empathy (Eight songs, nine tracks. Welcome death.)
Ancestor (Five tracks. Death of the Artist and Chinese mythology.)
Fear (A visual art exhibit in blog format.)
Nobody anymore, never again (Another visual art exhibit in blog format.)
The Everyblogger Triad: 1, 2, 3 (Embrace the bad writing, give into your psyche.)
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TeaTimeTraitor
 Posted: Aug 19 2015, 09:37 AM
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They/Them/Theirs (Genderqueer)


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QUOTE (DJay32 @ Aug 18 2015, 11:41 PM)
....Your overview of sertraline was very informative, though it further raises the question of "Why did it only take less than an hour for side effects to manifest in me?" ..hell, I have the same question regarding mirtazapine. I've little clue as to what this stuff is supposed to do besides the fine print on the pamphlet, but even that fine print doesn't mention anything about rendering me completely unconscious for over 24 hours. I can't work if I'm konked out and completely unwakeable.....


Because, according to the companies that designed sertraline, the researchers who've spent more time looking at it, and the usual response is:

The initial uptake of sertraline takes (around) 4 hours , 4-7 days for the side effects to start their cycle, and 24-28 days for the drug to properly cross the blood brain barrier.

But, again, this is VERY dependent on the individual taking them because of the whole fun body chemistry stuff.

(Basically, you'll get a lighter brighter mood 4 hours after first dose, but it'll take around month for it to get into the brain proper and actually 'do any good'*)

Sertraline is a bizarre SSRI in terms of how quickly it'll initially hit the system and how quickly it'll reach optimum concentration in blood plasma

...Basically psych meds work on half-lives, and drugs with shorter half-lives hit faster than ones with longer half-lives.

(*-Again see point that psych meds aren't magic bullets. They can limit and suppress signs of the disorder present, but they won't fix it.)

This isn't actually anything I've looked into too hard, because it goes into the more technical pharmacology and neurochemistry stuff quite quickly....

I'm thinking that a post on SSRI let downs, the joys of detoxing from psych meds, and what symptoms that doctors look for to take you off of meds maybe a good thing to post up in the future.


~ Pulling off Masks (complete) ~ Tea Time with the Traitor (on hiatus) ~ Mine Eyes Have Seen (active)

One day I'll actually finish up everything else, as well
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Hexillith
 Posted: Aug 19 2015, 07:23 PM
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Bat One
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My OCD post is becoming extremely long, so I'm going to split it up.

Subcategories of OCD with Overt Compulsions

NOTE: These posts concern just some of the more common types of OCD, and are by no means exhaustive. Also, it's important to understand that many people have more than one of these, and OCD can shift form over time. I personally have, or have had at one point, obsessions in every category that I will list and more besides, though there are maybe 3 that are really pronounced. And there is/can be a lot of overlap between the categories.

NOTE II: Neurotypical people are going to have some thoughts or behaviors they feel like fall under one of these categories. General rule of thumb is if it's not interfering with your ability to function or causing you to suffer, it's not a mental illness. OCD isn't a quirk. That said, I completely support people who *think* they might have OCD and proceed to do the research and see whether the shoe fits. My quarrel lies with to people who think their organized sock drawer means they're obsessive-compulsive, and then then go on to snicker about some totally neurotypical thing I do because they think it's my OCD.

NOTE III: Some obsessive-compulsive people are “sympathetic,” meaning they can pick up new obsessions/compulsions by learning about them. Sort of like “oh shit I never knew I had to worry about this before, but I do.” This note is to warn readers with OCD that this post contains fairly detailed descriptions of different obsessions and compulsions.

I'm going to start with the more stereotypical varieties, the ones with overt compulsions that are easily visible to those around the OC person. Gee, I wonder why those are so much better known? "Primarily obsessional" OCD with covert/subtle/internal compulsions is actually more common - I'll explain the difference later.

- Contamination. This, along with orderliness, is what most people think of as OCD - at least, the ones who actually understand what a mental illness is. Which makes sense, because it's very common. People with contamination obsessions fear that they will be corrupted in some way, usually meaning getting sick and possibly dying. Here's an article. It can also manifest as perceived moral contamination or something that will seem totally bizarre to a neurotypical. For example, I can't touch makeup or anything else my OCD perceives as feminine without handwashing or showering and I'm still not entirely sure why, but I think it may be linked to my gender dysphoria, because it's gotten way better since coming out. Another example might be fearing that you smell bad and your friends'll all leave you because of it.

Handwashing, showering, and other forms of cleaning are the compulsions associated with contamination OCD. Some people just have to rinse, and some will scrub their hands until they're cracked and bleeding. In extreme cases people may use laundry detergent, bleach, or other cleaning agents that aren't meant for that purpose. It also comes with lots and lots of avoidance compulsions.

- Superstition. You might sometimes see this referred to as "magical thinking," but I think that's inaccurate. I think all OC people likely have at least a little trouble with magical thinking, but in some people it's far more pronounced. Magical thinking is a maladaptive thought pattern which links events which are only tangentially or not at all related to one another. In this case, it will manifest as extreme superstition. This can mean obsession with numbers the person considers unlucky, certain words, classic superstitions like black cats and mirrors, or superstitions the person has come up with themself.

Compulsions for superstition OCD are often complex "rituals" composed of many compulsions performed in a specific order. These can include recitation or recollection of a particular list of items, special movements, arranging objects, tapping or touching objects in a certain way a certain number of times, and a whole lot of other things. The person believes that these rituals will cancel out the bad effects of whatever triggered them. If interrupted, they will likely have to start the ritual over from the beginning.

- Orderliness and Symmetry. People with this kind of OCD experience a deep sense of wrongness when physical objects are not arranged properly, which causes anxiety. They may have to arrange and rearrange things multiple times until it feels right to them. Mental ordering, “splitting” things like words to make them symmetrical, and counting are also common. People with this type of OCD often take much longer than others to perform simple tasks and will often become extremely distressed if someone else moves the items they’ve arranged. This can also lead to social difficulties because others find the OC person’s compulsions annoying. Simply feeling uncomfortable when an object is out of place is common in neurotypicals and does not indicate orderliness OCD.

Next I'll talk about primarily obsessional OCD. This is all poorly organized, sorry. I'm kind of going to be throwing information at you in no particular order.


Unseelie - The place where giants rule

Journal of the days after - Torn from xer awful embrace

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TeaTimeTraitor
 Posted: Aug 20 2015, 10:15 AM
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They/Them/Theirs (Genderqueer)


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Thank you~

Don't worry about the organization too much. (And I apologize for the fact that phrase is one of those often sarcastic stated ones. This is not its intent.)

At some point it'll end up being collated and put into a more brain-sense order, but since it's currently a thread where most of the participants are some form of brainweird...and it's a 'well, now that I think of it....' style thing in a lot of those regards, it's not too much of an issue.

(I know that DJ's been sort of organizing things on the series bible, and there's a wiki page/grouping of wiki pages dedicated to this.

...or there was last time I ventured on. Might not be, currently my brain is full of fluff and balloon strings, so not all that helpful)


~ Pulling off Masks (complete) ~ Tea Time with the Traitor (on hiatus) ~ Mine Eyes Have Seen (active)

One day I'll actually finish up everything else, as well
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