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 Prog Agora, A place to talk prog
Meursault
 Posted: Dec 30 2012, 09:17 AM
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God I love this thread.

Here's my top ten albums of 2012.

Honorable mentions:
Parallax II

The Afterman: Ascension.

10. Baroness-Yellow

9. Kamelot-Silverthorn

8. Ihsahn-Eremita

7. Children of Nova-Impossible Landscape

6. The Great Gamble-Book One

5. Headspace-I am Anonymous

4. Distorted Harmony-Utopia

3. Cynic-The Portal Tapes

2. Periphery-Periphery II

1. Soen-Cognitive

(For more a more in-depth look at these, subscribe to this: Prog Rock News Feed Writing this feed is how I make money and I need subscribers so they continue to pay me hahaha)


Fear Mythos/Slender Man Mythos:

Slender Man: Slender Man: Under the Microscope

Fear Mythos:

Immortals: If on the sound of static a traveler(finished)

Personal Blog: A Few Minutes of Solitude
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Meursault
 Posted: Jan 3 2013, 04:36 AM
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Zacksquest, you remember that shitty movie Priest that came out in recent years? Yeah, the source material for that is probably the same source material for "In the Presence of Enemies." It is a Korean (I think) comic book called Priest about a guy that sells half his soul to a devil-like character to get revenge for the death of his wife. It's pretty decent I guess. It was put out by TokyoPop I think, and I believe they went out of business, so look for online scans if you are interested.



Fear Mythos/Slender Man Mythos:

Slender Man: Slender Man: Under the Microscope

Fear Mythos:

Immortals: If on the sound of static a traveler(finished)

Personal Blog: A Few Minutes of Solitude
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DJay32
 Posted: Apr 8 2013, 06:31 PM
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Sally Death
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I BRING THIS THREAD TO LIFE to talk about Green Day.

While I was in London hanging out with SlendySlayer, we went to HMV (in Oxford Circus this time, which is said to be even bigger than the Piccadilly one!), and I got four albums. I got Tenacious D's Rise of the Fenix (which is good), Opeth's Watershed (which I have yet to listen to), and Green Day's American Idiot and 21st Century Breakdown.

I've really been gaining respect for Green Day, see. Like, American Idiot impressed the shit out of me. I never would have assumed that underneath the catchy repetitive sound was a story surprisingly similar to Rapture's fourth act. xD Or I mean, it's at least similar to Jordan's arc of finding a place for himself and learning to control his emotions. Just as the Fears represented Jordan's conflicting feelings (notably The Colour of Blood and Salmacis being passion and stoicity), Saint Jimmy and Whatsername were Jesus of Suburbia's rage and love.
And plus both stories are awfully big on teenager rhetoric and broad political statements and emotive language and just.. yeah, all that coming-of-age stuff about being a teenager! I suppose it's hardly farfetched that the two would be similar, but what I'm getting at is that I hadn't listened to this album at all before Rapture was right at its ending, so it's at least somewhat neat that there are similarities.

21st Century Breakdown, on the other hand, has a really vague story. Really fun music, but really vague story. It's a three-act love story, yes. But ignoring the fact that three-act stories aren't often done well, what the hell even happens in it? Christian's got a lot of pain and shit, Gloria's generally nice and is passionate about politics. And then... at some point they fall out? And Christian ends the album lamenting over things? Is that right? If so, I love the depressing ending. But still, clarification would be nice.

Why am I talking about Green Day in the prog thread?
..I have no actual reason, really. Kinda just throwing a topic out there.


EXHIBITS:
Viceking's Graab (Step inside the maze. You could spend an eternity here.)
The Mythology of Empathy (Eight songs, nine tracks. Welcome death.)
Ancestor (Five tracks. Death of the Artist and Chinese mythology.)
Fear (A visual art exhibit in blog format.)
Nobody anymore, never again (Another visual art exhibit in blog format.)
The Everyblogger Triad: 1, 2, 3 (Embrace the bad writing, give into your psyche.)
PLAN 31 (Frank Slenderman: Ace Attorney)
OH GOD THE RAPTURE IS BURNING (400,000 words. Five months. All Fears. Excess. On fifth draft, not final.)
Topography Genera (15 blogs. Conventional horror. See seas rise.)
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Meursault
 Posted: May 20 2013, 08:23 AM
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Watershed's a good album from what I remember.

I've never been able to get into Green Day. I'm not really sure why, either, since I am a fan of Punk music, to a decent extent. It might be too Pop for me or something, I'm not sure really. Pop punk blows ass-nuts.

This thread needs something to revive it. QUICK, we need to have a debate over some concept like that of Death of the Author hahahahaha


Fear Mythos/Slender Man Mythos:

Slender Man: Slender Man: Under the Microscope

Fear Mythos:

Immortals: If on the sound of static a traveler(finished)

Personal Blog: A Few Minutes of Solitude
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DJay32
 Posted: May 23 2013, 05:28 PM
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Sally Death
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Here's something I had written up for this thread somewhere around a year ago but never got around to posting.

Let me tell you about The Wall, and why I don't appreciate it as much as I could. First and most obvious is the popularity and widespread appeal of the album, but that one's obvious. Second is because I was raised on Genesis and, in terms of rock operas, The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway. While The Lamb wasn't the best story ever written or anything (2013 edit: And I will make a post about my criticisms of it sometime), it was a pretty damn clever story that was told in a good mixture between diegesis and metadiegesis, with Rael's actions being told both through himself and a narrator. The events, locations, and characters in The Lamb were memorable and gritty in their own rights. The music was never afraid to spend time experimenting (even if the musicians themselves were), giving the reader plenty of time to breathe. Plus, the overall story followed a more eastern-influenced structure, which I found hella interesting. And to top it all off, the lyrics themselves were accompanied by a prose telling of the actual story, so you could be sure you'd know what was going on.

So, when I finally got to listen to The Wall, I was actually really excited for it. I was expecting something really foreboding, maybe even oppressive, something fascinating by all means, a story that must have at least been as compelling and diverse as The L-- okay yeah you see where I'm going with this.

Maybe it's worth mentioning that, while I respect many of Roger Waters' points and talents (Animals was enough to win a lot of love from me), I dislike a lot of other parts of him, and I'm definitely not a big fan of the man himself. But this isn't a case of "Oh, all the best artists are assholes;" I was greatly influenced by, respect, and love the man that is Peter Gabriel, and I can say a lot of the same for Tommy Giles and probably other people I'm too lazy to think of off the top of my head (2013 edit: David Lynch, the members of Genesis, the members of Metallica, Justin Timberlake, the members of Coldplay, Billy Joe Armstrong, probably more).

..okay let me get to the actual points. First, there's the point that... not really a lot actually directly happens in The Wall. It effectively starts with Pink on the day of his concert, dwelling over his past in his head, and that's where we get his backstory that takes up the first disc. Hell, I a million times prefer the second disc to the first simply because things happen there, though it also happens to be a more experimental disc than the first.

So. What directly happens in The Wall? Pink dwells over his past, his manager comes in and drugs him up and throws him out to the stage, he plays a horrid concert that grows into an attempted rallying of bigotry (I forget if he actually succeeds in rallying people or if he's simply thrown out), then he undergoes a mental conflict where he decides he needs to expose himself to people. The end! :D

Is the ending a good ending or a bad ending? That's one people always seem to wonder, but I thought it was rather unambiguously a bad ending: It's said, plain and clear, in "The Trial:" Exposing himself to his peers is a punishment. Pink thinks he is guilty. Talking to people won't help him, not when he sees it as his deepest fear, effectively torture. And then, right after this, we get "Outside the Wall," where we're pretty much told that people are getting tired of being patient with Pink! If that's not directly telling us part of the story, then it's a waste of a song.

See, if the ending was actually ambiguous, I would be happier with it ending like that. But it's not. It's suggesting a lot of different things. Pink's not enjoying himself, and people aren't enjoying themselves, and they're now gonna be exposed to each other. You don't just end an album there, not with that build-up. There is no catharsis to the album, though "The Trial" is easily what Pink Floyd intended to pass as one. I will admit that "The Trial" was a great song and one of the best they had put out, but it just. It's.. disappointing. This entire album was disappointing to me, and often times unmemorable.

Not every part of the story needed to be in there, okay? That's what I dislike, one thing I dislike.

..that's all I had written back then, let's see if I can finish this.

I feel like The Wall spends more time telling the story than having fun with the music. There are exceptions, like "Is There Anybody Out There?", but the norm is to just keep on going with the story. And as I have already said, for all the storytelling they do, not much actually happens. The Wall is basically a really long character study with some semblance of a plot later on that suddenly ends pretending to be ambiguous. And while stories have had not-actually-ambiguous endings before, they put the focus on other things entirely than just the ambiguity (Inception comes to mind, where the point of the ending wasn't the ambiguity but the catharsis for Cobb).

So what the album feels like, to me, is a bunch of short songs that don't spend enough time letting me enjoy the music and then focus on a story that goes nowhere.

And I utterly hate Roger Waters' singing voice. I will not lie about that.

What I feel like bringing up now is a counterargument I fully expect people to make: "It's more an album than a story, so it shouldn't be held to the same standards as a story." Which is a fair point. But like in the case of Metropolis, part two (which I will also rant about at some point), what the album has become is this thing where the story is heralded as much as the album. And if a band is going to release an album where the story isn't just a side element but a main feature, it should have to earn its glory like every other story. And The Wall doesn't even meet the standards of a complete story. I'm fully willing to bet Pink Floyd ended the story on the note they ended it on because it worked with the music. I also expect Dream Theater did similar things with Metropolis because it suited the music rather than the story. And just. Bah. Don't make the story a focus, okay, if you're going to cut corners for the sake of the music. Or at least make sure you really know what you're doing.

The last complaint I will bring up is that of the "Isn't this where we came in?" I will commend them for it as this was a really nice idea and I love how it was executed. It's a memorable line, too. But what I will not commend them for is that IT HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH THE STORY
AGAIN, THIS IS SOMETHING THAT ONLY REALLY WORKS WITH THE MUSIC
THE STORY ITSELF IS NOT CYCLIC AND SHOWS NO SIGN OF BEING CYCLIC
SO THERE IS LITTLE POINT TO IT

There, that's my rant. I'll end on a happier note: Meursault, what do you think of the front cover for the Rapture Logs? It's a pastiche. Of something very much relevant to this thread. And I feel it's really appropriate to the story as well. The liberties Rappu took with the art work really well too.

EDIT: Okay, regarding "Another Brick in the Wall pt. 2," words cannot contain the sheer hate I have for THOSE FUCKING KIDS WITH THEIR GRATING FUCKING ACCENTS
OH MY GOD
SHUT THE FUCK UP
LEARN TO SPEAK PROPER ENGLISH
AND THEN SHUT THE FUCK UP


EXHIBITS:
Viceking's Graab (Step inside the maze. You could spend an eternity here.)
The Mythology of Empathy (Eight songs, nine tracks. Welcome death.)
Ancestor (Five tracks. Death of the Artist and Chinese mythology.)
Fear (A visual art exhibit in blog format.)
Nobody anymore, never again (Another visual art exhibit in blog format.)
The Everyblogger Triad: 1, 2, 3 (Embrace the bad writing, give into your psyche.)
PLAN 31 (Frank Slenderman: Ace Attorney)
OH GOD THE RAPTURE IS BURNING (400,000 words. Five months. All Fears. Excess. On fifth draft, not final.)
Topography Genera (15 blogs. Conventional horror. See seas rise.)
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Meursault
 Posted: May 26 2013, 09:24 AM
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(I am only half sane right now, so if this is a bit rambling, jumbled, and irrelevant at times, I apologize)

I actually don't think it is much of a stretch to critique an album like The Wall on its storytelling. It's similar to critiquing a song based off its lyrics. I don't see why the story should be saved from a critical eye "because: Music."

I've only listened to The Wall once on youtube, and I found it lacking. Granted, I was coming off The Who's Quadrophnia album, which I loved, at least musically. I rarely look at the story of a concept album (or rock opera if you care to make that distinction), and focus on the music, because the music is what I am generally concerned with as a musician listening to music. I don't usually bring the writerly part of me along for the ride. Anyway, The Wall was underwhelming. I think I also listened to The Lamb... that same day, which is uneven at times, but still awesome. The Wall underwhelmed me with that one listen, but I should probably listen to it again.

Fucking "In the Cage" is one of the best goddamn songs, by the by, that I have heard from the 70's prog, in fact all of prog, and that is saying something. At the least, I really like it.

I don't remember the "is't this where we came in?" line, but it sounds like they were being all "meta" and shit, but doing it really poorly, like is most often the case. Seriously, I guess in 1980 it was somewhat cool to do that still, but that shit has been going on forever, and the postmodern use of it has driven people to use it in abundance and think it is still fucking clever. It is NOT automatically clever. The guys who were using it, like Pynchon and Vonnegut and (I believe) Joyce, and Calvino and Eco, that made it popular, were using it really well and in new, creative ways. It's not creative to just say, "You're just reading a story" within the story. DO SOMETHING WITH IT.

I really like the cover, by the way. When I saw, what I think were, the preliminary sketches or line drawing version, I thought it was a perfect choice.

I always thought Waters' voice was kind of bland and uninteresting, but never have I hated it.

Every time I see the name Giles, I immediately think of Michael Giles.

Speaking of Between the Buried and Me, I've been learning the Selkies solo on guitar. I don't think I can do the sweeping part, but if I finish learning it/ learn most of it and fill in my own shit in that section, I'll record it and put it up for you all to see.

I feel like The Wall is just a redo of The Stranger and La Dolce Vita, the last section of it, or something. I've never looked up the story, so I am just judging from your little bits of synopsis.


Fear Mythos/Slender Man Mythos:

Slender Man: Slender Man: Under the Microscope

Fear Mythos:

Immortals: If on the sound of static a traveler(finished)

Personal Blog: A Few Minutes of Solitude
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DJay32
 Posted: May 27 2013, 03:40 AM
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"In the Cage" really is fantastic. One of my favourite songs of all time, and one of the main reasons I loved the album growing up. I came for that song, I stayed for everything. "Back in NYC" is another one of my favourites from the album, especially when played in succession with "Hairless Heart." Jesus fucking Christ, "Hairless Heart" is about as beautiful as it gets for me.

I should clarify that "Isn't this where we came in" was a book-end for the album. The Wall starts with a voice saying "we came in?" and ends with "Isn't this where." And it's a really neat concept in the music, but conceptually speaking it doesn't add up.

As for the Rapture cover, god man I just yes. I mean, I'm the one who suggested the pastiche idea to Rappu, but I did not expect her to go the whole nine yards with it, making it watercolour and adding all those little details to it (SALMACIS'S EYES ARE ON THE LEFT PICTURE, THE TOUR GUIDE IS ON THE RIGHT). The middle picture was originally gonna have all the protagonists falling down a hole but she had to limit it to Jordan because practicality. And DID YOU NOTICE THE SCARF COLOURS? Left is blue, middle is purple, right is red. I feel it was pretty appropriate, especially since red being the one watching the other two is kinda like The Neonate bordering on meta in Act IV.
I just.
God.
Freaking.
So much happy right now.
I could not be happier with Rapture at this precise moment. And it'll only get better.

"Selkies" is definitely a good song. Love playing it in Rock Band, I can even FC the solo. I love the concepts the lyrics talk about and how they parallel the myths of actual selkies. I look forward to seeing you do it.

Now, I could go on a tangent about how my views on postmodernism (and art in general) have changed a fair amount since our debate at the start of this thread, but I want to save that discussion for later.

For now, I'm going to talk about The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway. Buckle your seatbelts, because this is going to take me some time.

As anyone who has ever seen me discuss music in any form can tell you, Genesis's 1974 album The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway is in my Top 3 favourite albums of all time. The list itself constantly changes and I usually prefer not to think of albums in terms of "Top X," but this is one of the only albums I can definitively say will always be close to my heart.

DJay Listens to The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway, Movement I: Context

Let me start with a history lesson of this humble boy and why it means to me what it does. Back in 2007, when I was in the latter half of sixth grade, I didn't put much thought into music. I liked it, I listened to it whenever it was in a video game or a movie or my dad was playing it in the car. But I was twelve.

However, one day my dad was driving me to school and he had something in his hands. It was an album, an album he himself had enjoyed in college and finally got around to ordering off of Amazon and now wanted to play for me. That album was Nursery Cryme. You see, "The Musical Box" was, without a doubt, my dad's favourite song. Of all time. And my dad is a man who really did not enjoy prog. He was primarily a punk fan. But he'd heard that song in college and something about it-- the contrast in dynamics, shifting between heavy and soft so distinctively-- struck his fancy. Here was a song that took rock and used it to tell a story, an original story that had its influence in Victorian fairy tale. And this song was not afraid to show off its classical influences, and hell, its heavy sections got closer to modern-day heavy metal than I personally think any other band did for over a decade.

And, goddammit, I fell just as much in love with it as he had.
No. I fell more in love with it. I was enamoured, my mind was blown. A song that told a story, a song that didn't have three choruses, a song that was goddamn magical to a growing boy's mind.
From there, we listened to "The Return of the Giant Hogweed" (which is currently Rappu's favourite Genesis song, I feel like adding). We listened to "Harold the Barrel." We listened to "The Fountain of Salmacis" (which became and remains my favourite off of the album JUST HOLY FUCKING SHIT).

Actually, let me pull away for a bit to talk about these goddamn songs, oh my god I want to talk about Genesis.
"The Return of the Giant Hogweed!" This was where I was formally introduced to the concept of satire, proper fucking satire, British satire. Taking a minor thing and playing it up horrifically. Or okay satire's more complicated than that but one ramble at a time. Let's talk about the music. HAVE YOU HEARD THIS GODDAMN SONG. THE INTRO, ALONE, IS ENOUGH TO MAKE THIS SONG MEMORABLE. The chorus's melody is catchy and grand, the verses have that fantastic dynamic contrast Genesis seemed so goddamn good at, AND THE LATTER HALF OF THE SONG REMAINS ONE OF MY FAVOURITE MUSICAL PIECES EVER GODDAMN MADE. It is difficult for music to meet how beautiful this song gets for me. That guitar, that piano, those drums, that bass! And that grand classical march-like ending!
"Harold the Barrel!" Here's a song that I think is just long enough to pack an interesting take on a suicide with as much content as possible without drawing too long. The voices are memorable, the melodies fun, the lyrics hilarious ("YOUR SHIRT'S ALL DIRTY; THERE'S A MAN HERE FROM THE BBC!"), and its ending made me really sad when I first heard it. I love the story to this song, I really goddamn do. It's a vignette and it shows enough of the context to Harold's suicide to get the message across without dropping any anvils. It's not even a proper story; it's just a scene and we're left to draw our conclusions! See, that sounds to me like what Pink Floyd wanted to do with The Wall, but they presented their story a little too.. grand-ly and narratively, if that makes any sense.
"The Fountain of Salmacis!" Again with Genesis showing us how good they are at dynamic contrasts, this time they make use of it for those long swells that remind me of some classical portrayal of water. Which makes sense. Here was where I was first exposed to Greek mythology, you could say. As this was a point in my life where I was just about figuring out that I loved it when women were powerful and awesome, a story like this very much interested me. And lemme tell you, this is a song with a beautiful chorus. It was an effective chorus, as the lyrics changed each time and even had hidden lyrics sung by the backup vocals! AND LEMME CONTINUE TO TELL YOU, the guitar arpeggios after the third chorus are and always have been SEX for my ears. THAT is a goddamn guitar sound, man. And normally I'd say this song's ending goes on for a bit too long but I feel it works because this is the end of the album. I like it when last-songs-of-albums have grand endings. It feels like it's the ending to the song as well as the album!

..anyway.

From there, my dad ordered Foxtrot ("WATCHER OF THE SKIES" INTRO = SEX, "GET 'EM OUT BY FRIDAY" FLUTE SOLO = SEX, "CAN-UTILITY AND THE COASTLINERS" SYNTHESIZER AND GUITAR RHYTHMS = SEX AND DAT BASS SOLO, "SUPPER'S READY" = SEX SEX SEX SEX SEX) and then he ordered Selling England by the Pound ("FIRTH OF FIFTH" = SEX SEX SEX, "THE BATTLE OF EPPING FOREST" = SEX SEX SEX, "THE CINEMA SHOW" LAST SIX MINUTES = MY FAVOURITE THING EVER MADE), and then he ordered the album that gave me an awful lot to think about.

As I said, a song that told a story was magic in my twelve-year-old eyes. When I found out they had made a whole album that told a story? Oh my god, I was interested. Dad let me read the liner notes all the time and believe me, I spent a lot of time doing that. I read those liner notes again and again and a-fucking-gain. I read the lyrics, I listened to the album.

These Genesis albums became the first albums I ever borrowed off of my dad. I would write DCA and let the albums influence me. Of course, being still young and inexperienced, the influences were obvious and most often lampshaded. But the development of my writing is another ramble for another time.

The thing about The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway that most appealed to me was its surrealism. And as I talk more about it, you'll (that is, anyone reading will) hopefully see what I mean.

Movement II: Track by Track (Disc One)

IF YOU WANT TO LISTEN ALONG, CLICK THIS THINGER

"The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway" starts us off with a wonderful little classical-esque piano intro moving into the eponymous chorus "And the lamb lies down on Broadway." Right from the start, the music tells us this is gonna be grand and it's gonna be magical. The lyrics talk about the Manhattan scene and introduce us to our hero Rael. The liner notes do the same, though the liner notes establish a narrator I like to call "the Butterfly Collector," a narrator who Rael apparently doesn't like. It's made clear that Rael is something of a delinquent, spraying "RAEL" on subway walls. The music itself paints something of an American stadium rock feel with a light stage-musical wonder behind it, both aspects of which work appropriately.
Now, something interesting which both the lyrics and the liner notes make a point to feature are odd throwaway details. The liner notes tell us practically the life story of a policeman, for instance, and the lyrics switch to the point of view of a woman named "Suzanne" in the fourth verse. And hell, let's not forget that this story is literally named after a throwaway event: Rael, passing by Broadway street, sees a random lamb lying down. It has no bearing on the plot.
..well, it's worth mentioning that Suzanne isn't entirely throwaway; she offers a segue to one of my favourite lines in music history. As the lyrics paint it, Rael is crossing the street when a cab drives by, honking its horn at him (this cab transports Suzanne), and so we get this bit:

QUOTE
Cabman's velvet glove sounds the horn, and the sawdust king spits out his scorn: "Wonder women, you can draw your blind! Don't look at me; I'm not your kind! I'M RAAAAEEEEEL!"


Now, it could be argued that this is where we see our first hint that Rael is a misogynistic man, a detail which is analyzed and scrutinized symbolically throughout the story. This is what I personally suspect.

One more detail I will bring up is that of
QUOTE
Movie palace is now undone. The all-night watchmen had their fun sleeping cheaply on the midnight show; it's the same old ending, "Time to go, GET OUT!" It seems they cannot leave their dream. There's something moving in the sidewalk steam.
The story, you see, begins with people sleeping in a cinema. And one theory I had heard is that this is the evidence this entire story is meant to be a dream sequence. I will bring this theory up more from time to time.

BUT TIME TO MOVE ON

"Fly on a Windshield" is fairly straightforward. The music's magical and foreboding. The liner notes tell us a giant solid grey cloud lowers onto Manhattan, hitting the ground and expanding, engulfing everything and everyone. Rael tries to run from it, only for dust to settle on his skin, trapping him and leaving him to be engulfed too. The 'bass drop' in this song is goddamn effective.

"Broadway Melody of 1974" is, lyrically, a whole lotta American pop culture wordplay set to a steady blues-y rhythm (KEEP THIS RHYTHM IN MIND FOR LATER). The liner notes tell us that, as Rael watches the grey cloud come closer, he sees it acts more like a screen, showing everything inside as a frozen image. And as no one else in New York seemed to care about the wall of death, what Rael sees is like a zeitgeist picture of Broadway.
This song ends with three quiet swells. I once read a book dedicated to analyzing this album, and that book's main thesis was that the story was influenced by and parallels The Tibetan Book of the Dead, which is a book you're supposed to read to people as they die, as an instruction manual for navigating the afterlife. There was some pretty substantial evidence behind this theory, as Peter Gabriel had apparently read it before writing this album. And one of the points was that the instructions are split into four parts, and likewise is this album. The part changes are marked by swells, so this would be where the first part ends and the second part begins-- or in other words, Rael dies.

"Cuckoo Cocoon" has Rael wake up in a warm cocoon, wondering whether he's dead or dreaming or what. Musically, this song is relaxing and quiet and kinda alt. rock-y. It's got two flute solos and it's nice but it's really not too memorable. I will admit, this song is kinda skippable, even if I like what the story's going for.

"In the Cage" starts with a soft 12/8 heartbeat-like rhythm as Rael drifts off to sleep. The rhythm gets more of a beat as Tony Banks comes in with his orgasmic keyboard ostinatos, and suddenly this song gets almost dance-y. Rael wakes up to find himself in a rock cage. He panics, thinking back to previous imprisonments, looking outside his cage and seeing even more pressed together. Then as the song moves past its wonderful keyboard solo, we're treated to one of my favourite lyrics of all time:

QUOTE
Outside the cage, I see my brother John. He turns his head so slowly round, I cry out "HELP" before he can be gone, and he looks at me without a sound. And I shout out "JOHN, PLEASE HELP ME" but he does not even want to try to speak. I'm helpless in my violent rage, and a silent tear of blood dribbles down his cheek, and I watch him turn again and leave the cage. My little runaway!


John disappears, and Rael's cage dissolves entirely. Then without any reason, Rael's body spins like a top.
Now, let me bring up another little something that I adore about this song: Pop culture references. Let me just quote The Annotated Lamb Lies Down on Broadway here:

QUOTE
["My little runaway" is an allusion to "Runaway" (1961), a #1 hit by Del Shannon. Words by Del Shannon, music by Max Crook (who also plays the organ break on the record). "Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head" is then improvised here. It was written by Hal David and Burt Bacharach, and was recorded by B.J. Thomas for the film "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid." It also hit #1 on the charts. Genesis is apparently considerably influenced by Bacharach, cf. "Burt" the working title for Hold On My Heart.]


What's particularly awesome is that The Lamb does not use pop culture references for the hell of it; they are only used to convey Rael's thoughts and feelings. "Raindrops keep falling on my head, they keep falling on my head" is said because water is dripping on Rael's head, for instance. The references become a sort of language for him.
..but I digress.

Another interesting thing about this song is that it falls into a three-part structure. There are three choruses, there are three post-chorus bridges, there are three verses. The song itself is in three parts: 1) The soft heartbeat intro, 2) The bulk of the song, 3) A quiet and ominous instrumental interlude (which happens to be another one of my most favourite musical anythings ever). You'll see a pattern here, trust me.

In "The Grand Parade of Lifeless Packaging", Rael stops spinning to find he's on a tiled floor. In front of him is a receptionist trying to sell some sort of product. "It's the last great adventure left to mankind!" Or, quoting from the liner notes,

QUOTE
"This is the Grand Parade of Lifeless Packaging, those you are about to see are all in for servicing, except for a small quantity of our new product, in the second gallery. It is all the stock required to cover the existing arrangements of the enterprise. Different batches are distributed to area operators, and there are plenty of opportunities for the large investor. They stretch from the costly care-conditioned to the most reasonable mal-nutritioned. We find here that everyone's looks become them. Except for the low market mal-nutritioned, each is provided with a guarantee for a successful birth and trouble free infancy. There is however only a small amount of variable choice potential -- not too far from the mean differential. You see, the roof has predetermined the limits of action of any group of packages, but individuals may move off the path if their diversions are counter-balanced by others."


God, I just now realized that that paragraph is saying the Grand Parade itself is nothing more than a repair shop for human beings, and it's life itself that is likened to the industry metaphors. Fucking brilliant.
ANYWAY
Rael pays his way and enters the factory, seeing
WAIT I JUST GOT A THEORY, WHAT IF THE LAMB IS A METAPHOR FOR HUMAN ADVANCEMENT
BECAUSE THE LINER NOTES FOR THIS SONG START WITH "When all this revolution is over, he sits down on a highly polished floor while his dizziness fades away. It is an empty modern hallway and the dreamdoll saleslady sits at the reception desk." AND JUST
"WHEN ALL THIS REVOLUTION IS OVER"
WHAT IF
THAT MEANS LIKE A SOCIETY REVOLUTION
AND THAT THERE WAS A REVOLUTION AND IT LEFT HUMANITY WITH THIS INDUSTRY OF LOOKS AND REPAIRING PEOPLE AND MAKING THEM ALL PERFECT
BUT ALL THE STREETS ARE EMPTY AND LIFELESS AND PEOPLE DON'T CARE ABOUT ANYTHING BUT SELLING ANYMORE
AND ROMANCE IS CORRUPTED INTO NOTHING MORE THAN A FANTASY THAT DISTORTS HUMANS INTO INDULGENCE-OBSESSED CARICATURES
AND RAEL IS GIVEN A CHOICE BETWEEN RETURNING TO WHAT LIFE WAS LIKE BEFORE THE REVOLUTION OR STAYING WITH JOHN
WHAT IF

...okay, right. That gives you an idea of why I love this story.

Anyway! Rael enters the factory and sees that all their products are human body parts. He even recognizes some of the faces. His brother John has the number 9 stamped on his forehead.
The song itself is upbeat and industrial and processed to high heaven. Appropriate!
The song also has four choruses, which is another pattern the album has. If you'll recall, "The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway" had four choruses. ......I don't remember if I mentioned that.

"Back in N.Y.C." has Rael leave the factory to find he's now in a perfect underground recreation of New York City, devoid of all people. As he wanders, his mind drifts back to his memories. This song acts as Rael's backstory! The music gives us a simple 7/8 melody that gets more and more instruments as it goes along turning into one of the more memorable rhythms I know, with the occasional instrumental passage to make things even prettier.
Story-wise, we find out Rael was, indeed, a delinquent. He was in gangs, grew up on the streets. He hated progressives (liberals) trying to change his way of life, and he would often burn things down in retaliation. He's been to prison!
Structurally, this song has three verses and two choruses, the chorus consisting of one line three times. There's also a bridge between chorus one and verse three that consists of four instances of "Off we go."
Now, I want to talk about the chorus. Musically speaking, it introduces the melody to be used in "Hairless Heart." Including the pre-chorus, the lyrics are

QUOTE
As I cuddled the porcupine, he said I had none to blame but me. Held my heart, deep in hair. Time to shave, shave it off, it off! No time for romantic escape when your fluffy heart is ready for rape.


What does that actually mean? Well, "cuddling the porcupine" and "shaving the hairless heart" both refer to masturbation. Rael's masturbating and blaming himself for being alone. You gotta admit, Peter Gabriel chose a really pretty way to say that.
But wait, this backstory continues!

"Hairless Heart" is a short instrumental continuing the melody from "Back in NYC's" chorus. Beautiful and lamenting, and it's hilarious that this is such a gorgeous song about masturbation.

"Counting Out Time" introduces us to Rael's romantic history. I'll just... quote Peter Gabriel himself here:

QUOTE
"Which brings him to the memory chambers of his first romantic adventures: exciting subject. This particular hero, Rael, had purchased a book entitled 'Erogenous Zones and Difficulties in Overcoming Finding Them'. After many months of serious study, the moment of realization came; and he found himself an opposite number and completed his entire numerical motions in a mere 78 seconds. This magnificent piece of masculine performance left his opposite number a little less than titillated -- I'll rephrase that -- a little less than extremely excited,"


And we're treated to a musical telling of that through lyrics and music entirely written by Peter Gabriel! This is a quirky and rather comedic song with such great lines as "Look! I've found the hotspots, Figures 1-9. -- still counting out time, got my finger on the button, 'Don't say nuttin -- just lie there still and I'll get you turned on just fine" or "Move over, Casanova" or "Honey, get hit! It's time to unzip! TO UNZIP, ZIP, ZIP-UN-ZIP-A-ZIP!" or, my favourite, "I GOT UNEXPECTED DISTRESS FROM MY MISTRESS!"

Maybe now you guys are starting to get an idea of why I chose to call Jordan "Rael" in Rapture.

"The Carpet Crawlers", now here's a gorgeous song. Rael comes out of his memories to find a narrow warm corridor with imaginary creatures trapped in celluloid.
WAAAAIT A MINUTE
CELLULOID IS WHAT THEY USE TO MAKE FILM REELS
WHAT IF THIS IS, LIKE, THE MOVIE INDUSTRY? OR CINEMA IN GENERAL.

aaaanyway
He finds a line of people crawling through the corridors. A sphinx informs him they're trying to get to "the top of the stairs," where "a way out" awaits them. Rael passes by tables of harvest feasts and finds a spiral staircase going upward out of sight.

This song is absolutely beautiful. The lyrics paint a vivid picture for me, the music itself starts off light but gets so catchy, and just
so much happy.
Also, four verses and four choruses!

"The Chamber of 32 Doors" is not, in fact, where I got the "32" in my username from. I'll share that story some other day. For now, Rael makes it to the top of the stairs, where he meets an enormous room packed with people from wall to wall. The horizon is filled with doors, too many to count (probably more than 32, at least). He is told that one of these doors leads "out," but every other one just leads back again. He discovers that everyone in the crowd is too focused with trying to get an audience. This is where Rael comes to the conclusion that he needs someone to believe in. For the first time in the story, he shows a sign of weakness and runs to a corner of the room, hoping to find solace from all the shouting voices around him.
Musically, this song is kinda soulful, with powerful vocals and minimalist music. It conveys Rael's emotions pretty well and has some nice rhythms to it.

AND this marks the halfway point of the album! Disc one ends here!

I will do disc two next time! For now, I've been talking for way too long! I hope you've been enjoying my take on the album. It only gets weirder from here.


EXHIBITS:
Viceking's Graab (Step inside the maze. You could spend an eternity here.)
The Mythology of Empathy (Eight songs, nine tracks. Welcome death.)
Ancestor (Five tracks. Death of the Artist and Chinese mythology.)
Fear (A visual art exhibit in blog format.)
Nobody anymore, never again (Another visual art exhibit in blog format.)
The Everyblogger Triad: 1, 2, 3 (Embrace the bad writing, give into your psyche.)
PLAN 31 (Frank Slenderman: Ace Attorney)
OH GOD THE RAPTURE IS BURNING (400,000 words. Five months. All Fears. Excess. On fifth draft, not final.)
Topography Genera (15 blogs. Conventional horror. See seas rise.)
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Meursault
 Posted: Jun 7 2013, 04:14 PM
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Fighter


Group: Members
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Well, unfortunately, the colors are somewhat lost on me, as I am color blind. The blue and purple look pretty much the same to me. HOWEVER, that does not mean that it isn't cool. It is.

I'm interested to see how your views have changed, especially considering our last discussion of such topics.

I am waiting, by the way, for you to finish your analysis. You're sure taking your sweet-ass time. (Seriously though, it's good so far. I enjoy it. I can tell you gain a lot of joy from talking about it, which ends up making for a good read)


Fear Mythos/Slender Man Mythos:

Slender Man: Slender Man: Under the Microscope

Fear Mythos:

Immortals: If on the sound of static a traveler(finished)

Personal Blog: A Few Minutes of Solitude
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DJay32
 Posted: Jul 13 2013, 08:22 PM
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Sally Death
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Group: Admin
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I know you're waiting on my exciting continuation of The Lamb, but for now let me break up the story to give an intermission.

Dream Theater's Metropolis

Dream Theater released, in 1991, a song titled "Metropolis, Pt. 1: The Miracle and the Sleeper." It's probably one of their greatest songs. Even lyrically, it's one of their cleverer pieces, and it's one of those excellent gems of music wherein knowing what the song's about makes the music even better. You see, the lyrics tell a vague story based on the mythology of the founding of Rome. The song was intended, as a matter of fact, to be a parody of prog in general. The band tried to parody every progressive cliche they could think of, which is why the lyrics are vague and based on mythology. The music itself goes all over the place, including a four-minute instrumental section with focuses on all the instruments and quirky keyboard riffs and insane guitar solos. And the overall song goes out of its way to convey a feel of grandeur. It's an accurate parody. Hell, even calling the song "part one" was another jab at cliches!

By itself, the song is truly something to listen to. It makes it all the more sad when you listen to the second part and wonder where Dream Theater's clever writing went.

See, over the years Dream Theater gathered a large following, and one of the biggest requests fans had was for them to release a continuation of "Metropolis." And initially, the band had a twenty-minute instrumental playing off of melodies and riffs from the original that was to have been a fitting continuation.

......but they didn't publicly release that! Instead, they gave us this pile of shit.

Metropolis, part two: Scenes from a Memory came out in 1999, labelled as a full-length sequel to the song from Images & Words, and ever since its release it has been heralded by critics as one of Dream Theater's greatest albums, if not one of the greatest progressive rock/metal albums ever released. I listen to claims like that and I can't help but wonder if we're listening to the same album.

So first, a disclaimer and a counterargument. Scenes from a Memory is, musically and even lyrically, a solid album, and musically it's a very fitting continuation of the original song. I can definitely see why people love the album, and if you happen to love it, I don't blame you whatsoever. When I first heard it I thought the music was easily some of the coolest stuff I'd ever heard.

Theeeeee problem, and indeed the central focus of this post, is the concept. And as I had said regarding Pink Floyd's The Wall, if an album is released as a rock opera, that means the story is a main feature of the album. That means it's harder for it to be objectively heralded as great, as it must ascend in even more ways than a normal album. Such is the responsibility a band accepts when they release an album that tells a story. They can't have it both ways, you can't just dismiss the story if it's such a focus of the album and if the story is linked to the music. And the story of Scenes from a Memory is, in fact, linked to the music.

So can you understand my standards? Do they make sense? Then let me begin.

The first act of the album introduces us to Nicholas, a man who has been having vivid dreams of a woman that has been troubling his sleep. He goes to a hypnotherapist to access his dreams more lucidly, where we find out the woman was named Victoria, and she lived in 1928. Now, Nicholas's life is not actually detailed. ..at all. We hear, through one quick line in "Through Her Eyes," that he's got a kid and a wife, and he apparently has experienced grief before. This is all we learn about him, and that is the full extent of how we learn it, one quick line to relate himself to Victoria. The main focus of the story is in the mystery of his dreams, which becomes the mystery of Victoria's murder.

Really, the first act is the strongest act, conceptually. "Regression" takes us right into the action, introducing us to the hypnotherapist and to Nicholas and his dreams. The "Overture 1928" gives us wonderful music to show us that Dream Theater are definitely better musicians than they are writers. "Deja Vu" sets up the dream life of Victoria and how it.. apparently affects Nicholas in his day-to-day life, even if the way in which it affects him is not described. "Through My Words" gives us a soliloquy of Nicholas giving us his theory that he was Victoria in a past life and giving it through poetic lyrics. "Fatal Tragedy" has Nicholas investigate to see if he can find out about Victoria, only to learn from a random old man that "a girl was murdered here and it's a mystery." "Beyond This Life" actually tells us about the murder through a newspaper article from 1928-- Victoria's body was found alongside another man's, and the general consensus was he was her lover and murdered her because she split up with him. "Through Her Eyes" has Nicholas visit Victoria's grave and mourn her, deciding he wants to get to the bottom of the mystery.

So far, so good. In fact, so far it's rather engaging and makes me want to find out what happened!

The second act.. I'll just continue going song-by-song. "Home" already breaks off from the way the narrative had been set up, giving us dramatic irony by introducing us to the Sleeper (Julian, Victoria's lover) and the Miracle (senator and Julian's brother) but not having Nicholas be aware. The Sleeper was a druggie and a gambler, and Victoria grew upset with this and came to the Miracle for support, only to end up having an affair with him. And then we go back to Nicholas who's like "I MUST FIND OUT WHAT HAPPENED TO VICTORIA, THIS MYSTERY IS STILL PLAGUING ME THOUGH I WON'T TELL YOU HOW." "The Dance of Eternity" is a long instrumental representing sex and love because that's what "the dance of eternity" is said to be in "Metropolis, pt. 1." In "One Last Time," Nicholas has found rumours that Victoria hurt the Sleeper but ultimately he's got nothing. So he goes back to the hypnotherapist and has another dream where he's in.. the Sleeper's home? He's somewhere, and he hears a woman screaming and a man pleading forgiveness, so he steps up into that door and the music builds to a crescendo and...

We get "The Spirit Carries On." Here is the main problem, the central song at which the story falls apart. Nicholas is wondering grand philosophical questions such as "Where do we go when we die?" and then Victoria appears to him and says "Hey, don't worry about it! Your spirit carries on!" And so Nicholas... accepts that! He gives up on the whole investigation, feeling enriched, and goes home.

No, hold on, there's still more.

In "Finally Free," the listener gets to hear what really happened in 1928, even if Nicholas has no idea! We find out Victoria had decided to get back with the Sleeper and met with him one night, but the Miracle is a man scorned, so he goes and kills them both and covers it up because he's a senator. And then back in the present, Nicholas arrives home and is so happy in his ignorance but then the hypnotherapist shows up and shoots him, revealing to have been the Miracle in his past life!

The end!

Where do I begin.
Okay, so first of all there is no point to Nicholas. I personally cared for the guy, as he was set up as our narrator, and everything he knew was what we knew. But as soon as the second act started that was thrown out the window, and Nicholas became dumber than Jay in Marble Hornets. The dude just wanted some peace in his life, and all he got was religion and then he was shot. Really, why couldn't Nicholas have found out the truth? There'd have at least been some vague reason for the hypnotherapist to shoot him then-- he knew too much.

Just WHAT WAS THE POINT OF "THE SPIRIT CARRIES ON?" THAT IS MY ULTIMATE QUESTION. WHY WAS IT ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY TO HAVE THE SONG BE THERE? DID DREAM THEATER JUST FEEL LIKE THE ALBUM HADN'T FULFILLED THEIR BALLAD QUOTIA? That is honestly my speculation here, I bet that's how it happened-- Dream Theater wanted another ballad. BUT REALLY IT DID NOT SUIT THE STORY. IT WAS NOT CATHARTIC. YOU CAN'T JUST END A STORY WITH "Oh, that whole murder mystery thing that's plaguing your life-- the life we actually never heard anything about? Don't worry about it." "oh okay"

AND FURTHERMORE
THERE WAS NO POINT TO "FATAL TRAGEDY" WHILE I'M AT IT
IT COULD HAVE GONE STRAIGHT TO NICHOLAS FINDING/DREAMING ABOUT THE NEWSPAPER
IT WOULD HAVE MADE MORE SENSE
ALL THE OLD MAN DOES IS TELL HIM "A GIRL WAS MURDERED HERE, THIS FATAL TRAGEDY WAS TALKED ABOUT FOR YEARS."
He also tells him "You'll know the truth as your future days unfold" BUT NO
NICHOLAS DOES NOT KNOW THE TRUTH AS HIS FUTURE DAYS UNFOLD
NICHOLAS KNOWS JACK-SHIT
HE KNOWS WHAT HE LEARNED ACT ONE
THE OLD MAN SERVES NO GODDAMN PURPOSE BESIDES BEING CRYPTIC

WHY THE HELL DOES VICTORIA EVEN TELL HIM TO NOT WORRY ANYWAY
YOU'D THINK BEING MURDERED BY THE GUY WHO TOOK ADVANTAGE OVER YOUR VULNERABILITY WOULD MAKE YOU HAPPY TO KNOW SOMEONE'S TRYING TO FIND THE TRUTH

AND I MEAN "ONE LAST TIME" ENDED WITH SO MUCH FREAKING SUSPENSE
EVEN THE MUSIC WAS SUSPENSEFUL AND SINISTER, AS IF THE NEXT SONG WAS GONNA BE ONE HELL OF A SONG
BUT NO
WE JUST GET A BALLAD OF RELIGIOUS MOTIFS

FURTHERMORE, REALLY, WHERE DOES THIS OMNISCIENT NARRATOR COME FROM?
IT SHOWS UP WITH ACT TWO TO TELL US ABOUT THE MIRACLE AND THE SLEEPER AND THEN SHOWS UP AGAIN IN "FINALLY FREE" TO TELL US VICTORIA'S AND THE SLEEPER'S SPIRITS RISE THROUGH THE AIR
THE STORY MANAGED TO GO SEVEN SONGS PURELY ON DIEGESIS AND FIRST-PERSON NARRATION, WHY DID IT COME IN

The final thing I will point out is that "Metropolis, Pt. 1" was A GODDAMN PARODY OF PROG CLICHES. I would love to think Scenes from a Memory is a parody of musical cliches or something, but every bit of research I've done on this album has shown me the band intended it to be taken straight! How does the overall "Metropolis" story go from parody/the founding of Rome to "Inception-meets-Sherlock Holmes?!"
The only connection between the two (besides musically, which again is a solid and wonderful connection) is in the names taken from the original song: "The Miracle," "the Sleeper," and "Metropolis." Not even the lyrical theme of sharing the same mind actually carried over, as Victoria and Nicholas don't share the same mind, they're essentially unrelated but are simply said to be past lives! Even then, being past lives is not the same as sharing the same mind.

..so there. Those are my main problems with Scenes from a Memory: No goddamn catharsis. Dream Theater seems to think we genuinely care about the murder mystery more than we care about Nicholas, which is why they tell us what really happened rather than letting Nicholas find out himself. That's not how narratives work. If you make a character the focus for the duration of the narrative, we're gonna care about him, and if he doesn't get catharsis, we don't get catharsis. We only cared about the murder mystery because it was plaguing Nicholas's life, vague as that life was.

I'm repeating myself. To continue repeating myself, the music's great, and the lyrics by themselves work really well. But the focus of the album is both on the music as well as on the story, so since the story doesn't hold up, it ultimately means the album itself is decent.

And people say Dream Theater lost their sense of a good concept around Black Clouds & Silver Linings. Their concepts have always been hit-and-miss. Their forte is songwriting and performance. Luckily, they themselves seem pretty aware of this and usually focus on their music anyway. I just get angry when people praise the album and don't even mention the story's problems.

My next post will continue talking about The Lamb.


EXHIBITS:
Viceking's Graab (Step inside the maze. You could spend an eternity here.)
The Mythology of Empathy (Eight songs, nine tracks. Welcome death.)
Ancestor (Five tracks. Death of the Artist and Chinese mythology.)
Fear (A visual art exhibit in blog format.)
Nobody anymore, never again (Another visual art exhibit in blog format.)
The Everyblogger Triad: 1, 2, 3 (Embrace the bad writing, give into your psyche.)
PLAN 31 (Frank Slenderman: Ace Attorney)
OH GOD THE RAPTURE IS BURNING (400,000 words. Five months. All Fears. Excess. On fifth draft, not final.)
Topography Genera (15 blogs. Conventional horror. See seas rise.)
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Vinyl Asylum
 Posted: Nov 13 2014, 07:01 PM
Quote


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Group: Members
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Joined: 10-March 14









QUOTE (DJay32 @ Jul 13 2013, 03:22 PM)


My next post will continue talking about The Lamb.


Was this post never made, or is it in a different thread?


FEAR MYTHOS BLOGS
-David's Dream Journal
(http://ofnightmaresanddreams.blogspot.com/)
-Calls of the Silent Forsaken
(http://hearthemcallingfromoutside.blogspot.com/)
-Aboard the Dreadnaught (http://inthehallsofdeathsship.blogspot.com/)
SLENDER MAN MYTHOS BLOGS
-Pictures of Nature
(http://imagesfromtheworldaroundus.blogspot.com/)
NONFICTION BLOGS
-Musings
(https://www.tumblr.com/blog/musingsonhorrorandotherstuff)
PM
DJay32
 Posted: Nov 14 2014, 01:27 AM
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Sally Death
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Group: Admin
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Never made, partly because Meursault left the mythos (and he was the main audience) and partly just out of never getting around to it.

Hello, thread. I haven't been listening to all that much prog lately, besides the usual. I've discovered the joys of B-sides, though. Genesis made some nice ones like "Twilight Alehouse" and the always wonderful "Naminanu" and "Submarine," which would have really made Abacab one of my favourite albums had they been kept.
But there is one new band I've gotten into! ...well there are a lot of bands I've gotten into but there's one at least one more prog band!

fuck okay I guess I'll list all of them

Scale the Summit, who I've always rather liked but I recently got The Migration. Really pretty. Really really pretty. Those guys are fantastic at writing instrumental songs that paint landscapes for the ears.

Tool, finally got around to listening to Tool. Haven't really gotten into them yet, so much as I've just been loving "Schism" and "Prison Sex." I've listened to a few of their albums all the way through, I do like their general sound an awful lot but I've yet to.. give them much of a focus?

Van Friscia, I've always loved him because he wrote especially for Rock Band and not only were his songs really fun to play but they were also really rad to listen to. I got the Epic Symphony in A Flat Minor on CD a while back, that suite gives me so much nostalgia. If Tiger Stripes could ever be said to have a theme song, it'd be the second movement. It's certainly my most-played song in the game. I wish his second album/EP would get a CD release, as "Rise Above" is epic and "The Duel" is literally the best thing ever.

Verse Vica! Ooh, my indie cred can get a tiny bit higher. These guys recently put out their first album, Endeavor, and I decided to buy it so I could say I bought a first album. Surprisingly good. Tight, crisp, interesting lyrics, fucking catchy melodies, and let me tell you, "Marumari" is one of the greatest songs I've ever heard in my life.

Honourable mention goes to Mastodon, as I finally got around to checking out Leviathan (thanks to reading Moby-Dick, which the album is loosely based on) and good god that might be my favourite Mastodon album now. Though it's always gonna be hard to top Blood Mountain in my mind.

Really, most of my listening lately has been pretty un-progressive. Justice, Coldplay, Death From Above, Them Crooked Vultures, Daft Punk, Dethklok (as always), and a lot of BGMs. Though I've been getting back into Between the Buried and Me. Their songs are definitely classics, I can't ever not think that. Ever since Colors, they've consistently been producing masterpieces.

I've been meaning to give The Lamb another listen lately, so I might try to finish up my big ramble thing for it when I do.


EXHIBITS:
Viceking's Graab (Step inside the maze. You could spend an eternity here.)
The Mythology of Empathy (Eight songs, nine tracks. Welcome death.)
Ancestor (Five tracks. Death of the Artist and Chinese mythology.)
Fear (A visual art exhibit in blog format.)
Nobody anymore, never again (Another visual art exhibit in blog format.)
The Everyblogger Triad: 1, 2, 3 (Embrace the bad writing, give into your psyche.)
PLAN 31 (Frank Slenderman: Ace Attorney)
OH GOD THE RAPTURE IS BURNING (400,000 words. Five months. All Fears. Excess. On fifth draft, not final.)
Topography Genera (15 blogs. Conventional horror. See seas rise.)
PM
Vinyl Asylum
 Posted: Nov 14 2014, 01:44 AM
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Corrupted


Group: Members
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QUOTE (DJay32 @ Nov 13 2014, 08:27 PM)

Tool, finally got around to listening to Tool. Haven't really gotten into them yet, so much as I've just been loving "Schism" and "Prison Sex." I've listened to a few of their albums all the way through, I do like their general sound an awful lot but I've yet to.. give them much of a focus?

Honourable mention goes to Mastodon, as I finally got around to checking out Leviathan (thanks to reading Moby-Dick, which the album is loosely based on) and good god that might be my favourite Mastodon album now. Though it's always gonna be hard to top Blood Mountain in my mind.

Really, most of my listening lately has been pretty un-progressive. Justice, Coldplay, Death From Above, Them Crooked Vultures, Daft Punk, Dethklok (as always), and a lot of BGMs. Though I've been getting back into Between the Buried and Me. Their songs are definitely classics, I can't ever not think that. Ever since Colors, they've consistently been producing masterpieces.

I've been meaning to give The Lamb another listen lately, so I might try to finish up my big ramble thing for it when I do.


Tool does have a really good sound. I personally like them, but they're definitely not for everyone. I'd recommend 10,000 days and Lataeralus, personally I think those two are great.

Only ever heard Blood and Thunder off of that Mastadon album, but I can attest to that song's greatness.

Why did Meursault leave the mythos? He seemed really cool.

Also, as for finishing up the Lamb review- yesplease!!!


FEAR MYTHOS BLOGS
-David's Dream Journal
(http://ofnightmaresanddreams.blogspot.com/)
-Calls of the Silent Forsaken
(http://hearthemcallingfromoutside.blogspot.com/)
-Aboard the Dreadnaught (http://inthehallsofdeathsship.blogspot.com/)
SLENDER MAN MYTHOS BLOGS
-Pictures of Nature
(http://imagesfromtheworldaroundus.blogspot.com/)
NONFICTION BLOGS
-Musings
(https://www.tumblr.com/blog/musingsonhorrorandotherstuff)
PM
Vinyl Asylum
 Posted: Nov 14 2014, 01:47 AM
Quote


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Group: Members
Posts: 448
Member No.: 376
Joined: 10-March 14









Also, while not entirtely prog by most definitions of the word- I'd say half prog- I must recommend The Who's Quadrophenia. Interesting ideas, and although they could have been fleshed out much more (as Djay says about The Wall, not much actually happens aside from flashbacks), the music is superb, and the framing device works with it. Highly recommend.


FEAR MYTHOS BLOGS
-David's Dream Journal
(http://ofnightmaresanddreams.blogspot.com/)
-Calls of the Silent Forsaken
(http://hearthemcallingfromoutside.blogspot.com/)
-Aboard the Dreadnaught (http://inthehallsofdeathsship.blogspot.com/)
SLENDER MAN MYTHOS BLOGS
-Pictures of Nature
(http://imagesfromtheworldaroundus.blogspot.com/)
NONFICTION BLOGS
-Musings
(https://www.tumblr.com/blog/musingsonhorrorandotherstuff)
PM
Themanwhocreatedjazz
 Posted: Feb 15 2015, 09:17 AM
Quote


Runner


Group: Members
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Member No.: 414
Joined: 3-January 15









I suppose my favorite progressive rock band is Ozric Tentacles, and I highly recommend listening to their song Sunscape


The Fears In Mythology - Looking at the Fears Mythological counterparts (sort of)
Behind The Bookshelf - Some short stories based upon my dreams.
My Father's Notebook - Some short stories about the Fear Mythos
Cutting Up The Fear Mythos - Applying the cut up technique to the Fear Mythos
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DJay32
 Posted: Jul 29 2015, 12:26 AM
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Sally Death
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Group: Admin
Posts: 4590
Member No.: 8
Joined: 17-May 11











EXHIBITS:
Viceking's Graab (Step inside the maze. You could spend an eternity here.)
The Mythology of Empathy (Eight songs, nine tracks. Welcome death.)
Ancestor (Five tracks. Death of the Artist and Chinese mythology.)
Fear (A visual art exhibit in blog format.)
Nobody anymore, never again (Another visual art exhibit in blog format.)
The Everyblogger Triad: 1, 2, 3 (Embrace the bad writing, give into your psyche.)
PLAN 31 (Frank Slenderman: Ace Attorney)
OH GOD THE RAPTURE IS BURNING (400,000 words. Five months. All Fears. Excess. On fifth draft, not final.)
Topography Genera (15 blogs. Conventional horror. See seas rise.)
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